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Category: Mexico

Road Trip Through Mexico

Ciudad Obregon

Three weeks in Mexico and our journey was just beginning as we crossed the border into Central America. Looking back on my time in Mexico, in the initial leg of the trip we witnessed the cactus and shrub dotted mountains of Sonora. There was magic in the air, butterflies fluttered through the sky, swooping daringly in front of our van, orange and yellow wings glinting in the sunlight. Our first night was spent in Alamos due to the van incident that altered our itinerary.

Sonora Mexico

The second day saw us on the road to Mazatlán, bumping along the highway, learning how to deftly negotiate a multitude of pot holes and cracks, and becoming pros at passing up slow-moving semi-trucks. Nearing our beachside destination, we were greeted by a landscape of rugged coastline, reminiscent of the scrub brush covered stretch of Highway 101 between Orange County and San Diego in California.

Mexico

Continuing on our journey to Guadalajara we passed countless fields of corn, rice, and sugar cane. Eventually the fields transitioned to the bluish-green agave plant, marking the home of tequila. After experiencing the traffic and crowds of Guadalajara, a night in the small charming town of Tequila would have been preferred.

Tequila Mexico

Leaving Guadalajara we drove through the state of Michoacán to arrive in Metepec, a suburb outside Mexico City. Staying with my family, we were given the full tour of the area, visiting Mexico City and other places nearby like Teotenango, Grutas de Cacahuamilpa, Toluca, Teotihuacan, and La Marqueza. Our days were packed with places to go, sights to see, and food to eat.

Mexico

As two weeks came to an end in Metepec, we loaded up our van for the drive to our final destination: Palenque. We drove though the mountainous state of Puebla, at one point driving high atop a misty mountain range jutting towards the sky. The winding road down brought us into an entirely new landscape in the state of Veracruz. The dry air became humid and the land covered in the greenery of tropical forests. That night we slept in a hotel in Minatitlan, the only place in the entire trip where I was almost overwhelmed with the feeling of homesickness. A heavy gray cloud blanketed the sky with yellow and black fumes drifting into the air from distant industrial operations. The air was oppressive in its heat and humidity, the only refuge was our small hotel room which smelled of old cigarettes.

Tepic Mexico

Bound for Palenque, we hastily left the next morning, happy to be out of the depressive town. Driving through the states of Veracruz and Tabasco we finally made it to the state of Chiapas – tropical greenery, humid air, and long stretches of empty road greeted us at every turn. Our excitement built as we turned onto the road to Palenque, our last stop in Mexico before we crossed into Guatemala.

Mexico

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Palenque: Traveling from Present to Past

Palenque Mexico

From the start of our road trip through Mexico we knew we would visit Palenque. The idea came to fruition one night at dinner with family. Over grilled salmon, I learned that back in the 1970s my mom visited Palenque. To me, following in her footsteps to the places she traveled brings a unique connection to the memory of her life, an invisible connection, linking my present to her past.

Palenque Temple of Inscriptions
Temple of Inscriptions – tomb of Pakal

We arrived in Palenque on a two-lane road, our van rolling up and down the landscape of sloping hills. To our left and right were verdant forests, hot and humid, the green of the leaves almost yellow in the glaring sunlight. Periodically we glanced at each other, anticipating our moment of arrival into Palenque, once a thriving city, home to the ancient Mayans. To this day you can still hear their language spoken by some six million living descendants throughout Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras.

Palace of the kings
Palace of the kings
Hallway of the Palace
Hallway of the Palace – architecture of the hallway is known as a corbel arch

The next day, after joining a tour group of travelers at the ruins of Palenque, our guide led us into the jungle, down a trail to a crumbling structure emerging from the plant life that had overtaken it. We learned from our guide that inside the tomb archaeologists found the remains of the “Red Queen”. Named the red queen from the red cinnabar powder she was buried with that turned her bones red, this matriarch was a queen who ruled Palenque for a time.

Bas relief statue of K'inich Kan B'alam II
Bas relief statue of K’inich Kan B’alam II located in the Palace
Toilet in the Palace
Toilet in the Palace – water was supplied through an aqueduct

In the humid, damp heat of the forest we swatted away mosquitos, while leafs from the tree branches above fluttered down amongst our feet. We peered up to the canopy, hopeful for a monkey sighting, but none appeared.

Courtyard interior of the Palace
Courtyard interior of the Palace

Leaving the suffocating jungle behind, our guide led us to the portion of the ruins open to visitors. Upon entering the overgrown city we were greeted by the pyramid known as the Temple of the Inscriptions, burial tomb of the 7th century ruler K’inich Janaab’ Pakal. As we wandered from the pyramid over to Pakal’s palace, the guide told us the story of the Mayans who once thrived in this city.

Temple of the Cross
Temple of the Cross

A city only revealed ten percent to archaeologists, the rest remains buried under the jungle awaiting discovery and analysis. The city dates back to 226 BCE, experiencing most of the architectural rebuilding of the pyramids that we see today in the early 600s CE, then abandoned in the late 8th century.

Temple of the Cross and Temple of the Count
Temple of the Cross to the right and Temple of the Count to the left – notice the structure crowning the pyramids, known as a roof-comb, pictographic symbols on the stone give name and purpose to the pyramids

Saying goodbye to the ruins of Palenque our tour continued on to Agua Azul, a stunningly beautiful crystal clear river tumbling down a smooth riverbed of lime rock. Situated next to the river was a large outdoor market, with small open air stalls selling souvenirs, trinkets and food.

View of the Palace and Observation Tower
View of the Palace and Observation Tower

Seeing our tour bus driver sitting alone to lunch we and a fellow traveler joined him. He began to tell us his story of Palenque, about his life, the growth of the town, and the changes enacted by the Zapatistas. Prior to 1992 the town of Palenque had no paved roads, hospitals, electricity or schools, that is, until the Zapatistas struggled with the government and demanded the installation of basic services.

Agua Azul
Agua Azul

As he reminisced, I thought of Palenque in the 1970s, a single lane dirt road passing through a barely there town of a few hundred families. The changes of the past forty years are apparent, now boutique hotels host international travelers, cars overwhelm the narrow roads, and souvenir shops are abundant.

Market next to Agua Azul
Market next to Agua Azul

 

 

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Tips for Driving in Mexico

 

Tips for Driving in Mexico
Mexico City

 

If you plan to drive in Mexico there are a few things to consider: toll roads, driving “rules”, and restrictions.

1. Toll Roads

In Mexico the main highway system is a series of connected toll roads, however alternative free roads are offered (at your own risk). We were advised to remain on toll roads as they are better maintained and safer. Of course, the cost of the tolls do add up, but the price is well worth it to drive on a maintained road. The toll varies from as little as $1 to $20, to get an idea of the toll cost for your chosen route check out this mapping service.

2. Driving “Rules”

Driving in Mexico, while similar to the US, has some unwritten rules of conduct. For one, we learned that drivers do not stop at a yellow light, but keep going and only after the light is decidedly red do they stop. For left turns there are not dedicated turn signals, instead wait until the light turns red then go, this is your window of opportunity. Drive as fast as you can with the flow of traffic, the speed limit signs mean nothing, that is why you have to keep your eyes peeled for speed bumps. Called topes, these handy speed deterrents are used all over Mexico for speed control. Last but not least, passing around slower moving cars or trucks on a one-lane road is common, just make sure to avoid passing on hills, curves or blind turns. Driving in Mexico felt like the wild west, no hard and fast rules, just action and guts. I’m not sure how I’ll ever get used to driving in rule obsessed US again!

3. Mexico City driving restrictions

Before arriving in Mexico I read briefly about the driving restrictions known as Hoy No Circula in Mexico City, however I was unclear how they worked until we were forced to postpone our drive from Metepec to Palenque because all highways pass through Mexico City. Due to the large regional population, vehicle congestion and concern about high pollution levels the government enforces a restriction based on license plate numbers, only allowing certain vehicles to drive on certain days within the limits of Mexico City. For example, the license plate number of our vehicle ends in a 2 so we were unable to drive in the city on Thursdays and because we are tourists our vehicle was not allowed to drive in the city on Saturdays and everyday before 11am. I am not sure how rigorous they are about enforcing the rules, but we were not going to risk it to find out, to enter and exit the city you go through a toll booth where there are armed guards, so presumably they are checking license plates. To find out more read here.

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Templo Mayor: ancient temple of the gods

Templo Mayor History

In the heart of Mexico City is where you will find Templo Mayor, part of the Aztec center of ritual known as the Sacred Precinct in the city of Tenochtitlan. Exposed to the world by the archaeologist Manuel Gamio in 1914 the rest of the Aztec empire remains buried beneath the avenues and buildings of the modern age.

First constructed in 1325, Templo Mayor was at one time a soaring edifice of dual pyramids dedicated to the gods. One pyramid dedicated to the rain and earth god Tlaloc, representing Tonacatepetl the Hill of Sustenance, the other dedicated to the war god Huitzilpochtli, representing his birthplace on the Hill of Coatepec.

Now all that is left is the base of the pyramid and prior versions built by successive rulers buried deep below the earth. The Spanish conquerors dismantled the pyramids to reuse the stone to build their own temple, the Metropolitan Cathedral.

Metropolitan Cathedral built with stones from Templo Mayor
Metropolitan Cathedral built with stones from Templo Mayor
Templo Mayor
Remaining base pyramid of Templo Mayor
Interior walls of Templo Mayor
Interior walls of Templo Mayor
Modern Mexico City beyond the walls of Templo Mayor
Modern Mexico City beyond the walls of Templo Mayor
Statues of Templo Mayor
Statues of Templo Mayor
Snake Wall
Snake Wall
Statue of snake
Statue of snake
Chac Mool
Chac Mool (offering statue)

 

Sources and further reading:

Miller, Mary Ellen. 2012. The Art of Mesoamerica: From Olmec to Aztec. 5th ed. Thomas & Hudson Ltd, London.

The Met Museum Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History on Templo Mayor

Archaeology Magazine article by Roger Atwood

Museum Victoria lecture by Dr. Carlos Javier Gonzalez

 

 

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Two Days in Mexico City

Two Days in Mexico City

Since getting used to small town beach life in California I have become less enchanted with traveling to big cities. But when in Mexico, there was no way I was going to miss out on visiting bustling Mexico City. A city of 9 million, there is no respite from the constant flux of people. Sprawled upon 1,485 square kilometers of land, the city is cradled by a mountain range of volcanoes reaching elevations of 5,000 meters. Once the location of Lake Texoco, the valley is now awash with a sea of urban buildings as far as the eye can see. Informal settlements perch on the mountain sides, while some of the wealthiest people in the world make the downtown core their home.

Mexico City

Saved from having to drive ourselves into the chaotic fray of stop and go traffic, we used our time wisely in the city to fill our days with cultural sights. The city is steeped in its historic past, with Spanish colonial era architecture brushing up against 15th century Aztec ruins, all together juxtaposed with modern glass towers reaching to the sky.

Palacio del Correo
Palacio del Correo

Dizzying to the senses, Mexico City is both grand while also containing a dark underbelly of poverty. While we did not venture forth to the informal settlements, you would almost not know they existed among the shop lined streets of Centro Histórico.

Mexico City

What follows is a selection of cultural and historical experiences for a fully packed two day visit to Mexico City. This by all means does not encapsulate the multitude of things to do and see in a city with over 150 museums and hundreds of neighborhoods.

Mexico City

DAY 1

After a drive down the picturesque Avenue Paseo de la Reforma, lined by seasonally landscaped gardens, opulent mansions, and the outer edges of Chapultepec Park, begin your day at the National Museum of Anthropology. Make sure to get an early start as this museum could easily take all day, but if you structure your time well it can be covered in four hours. This expansive museum covers the history of Mexico from the ancient Neanderthals to the Aztecs and Mayans. Carefully curated collections of art, pottery, jewelry, textiles, weapons, and statues are displayed in different rooms separated by time period and civilization.

Museum of Anthropology
Museum of Anthropology

If you are not experiencing museum fatigue then make sure to visit Soumaya Museum, created to house millionaire Carlos Slim’s personal art collection. Opened in 1994, the avant garde style building offers several floors of unique pieces. The exhibit of intricately carved ivory from China and India is a must see. Other exhibits include collections of 15th to 18th century European masters, 19th century Mexican artists, sculptures by Rodin, and coins from Mexico’s colonial past.

Museo de Soumaya
Museo de Soumaya

End the day with a stroll through Chapultepec Park where a bevy of diversions await. If you so choose there is a Museum of Natural History, Zoo, Museum of Fine Art, and Chapultepec Castle. Or to end the day lightly, meander the trails of the park to take in the views of the lakes, while stopping for a keepsake at one of the hundreds of stalls selling brightly colored woven backpacks and jewelry.

DAY 2

Start your second day at Palacio de Belles Artes, originally a 19th century national theater before being rebuilt in the 1930s in the Art Nouveau style. The land below holds such historical wonders as a 17th century convent and an Aztec plumed serpent altar. The interior features murals by renowned Mexican artists including Sigueiros and Diego Rivera. There are a few art and photography collections, but the remainder of the space is used by the National Opera, National Theater, and National Dance Company.

Palacio de Belles Artes
Palacio de Belles Artes

Next stop is Centro Histórico, encompassing Avenue 5 de Mayo and the surrounding streets. This pedestrian only avenue is lined with shops and restaurants. Continue down to the National Palace and Metropolitan Cathedral located along Plaza de la Constitucion. Take in the grand structures before entering a tour of Templo Mayor, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Templo Mayor is a Postclassic period Aztec temple first built in the 1300s dedicated to Tlaloc, the god of rain, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of war.

Centro Historico
Centro Historico
Book Seller Market
Book Seller Market
Templo Mayor
Metropolitan Cathedral beyond the wall of Templo Mayor

Treat yourself to a meal at Restaurante El Cardinal located in a building reminiscent of French architecture. Dine on the second or third floor of the building overlooking Centro Histórico. The menu offers a variety of traditional Mexican dishes including moles and tacos. Make sure to start with a Pre-Columbian delicacy, fried maggots served with homemade tortillas and guacamole.

Ecobici City Bike Share
Ecobici City Bike Share next to El Cardinal
Centro Historico
Centro Historico

Finally, end the day atop Torre Latinoamericana, now the second tallest building in Mexico City at 188 meters. Take an elevator up to the 44th floor to watch the sun set over the city. Completed in 1972, the building offers stunning 360 views of Mexico City, a satisfying finish to two full days.

Nacional Palacio
Nacional Palacio
Avenue 5 de Mayo
Avenue 5 de Mayo

 

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Toluca and the Cosmovitral Botanical Garden

Toluca Cosmovitral

My visit to Toluca was a brief encounter. We visited the state capital of Mexico for the specific purpose of seeing the Cosmovitral. A botanical garden from 1910, built in the Art Nouveau and Neoclassical architectural style, is popular for its beautiful stained glass windows. The stained glass, designed by Mexican artist Leopoldo Flores, depicts the scene of the symbolic search of light by man, where his spirit is elevated from the shadows of evil and ignorance by good and wisdom.

Toluca Cosmovitral
Cosmovitral

After arriving we strolled around Plaza de los Mártires (Plaza of the Martyrs), named for the Battle of Teotenango Hill during the Mexican War of Independence. The plaza is surrounded by the Cosmovitral, Catedral de San José de Nazaref, church of El Carmen, museums, and government buildings. Beyond are hills covered with brightly colored homes.

Toluca Mexico
Plaza de los Mártires
Catedral de San José de Nazaref
Catedral de San José de Nazaref

Inside Cosmovitral you are greeted by fountains and lush greenery. The sounds of spraying water muffles the voices of people wandering the paved paths, admiring the over 400 species of plants in the garden. Stained glass windows surround the entire building, sending filtered light through the panes of glass illuminating the symbolic story.

Toluca Mexico Cosmovitral

El Hombre del Sol
El Hombre del Sol

Cosmovitral

Cosmovitral

Cosmovitral

Exiting the Cosmovitral we headed over to a small museum of torture displaying instruments used during the Spanish Inquisition. The museum displays every kind of horrible device certain to cause pain or death to people for punishment of a crime or for torture to gain information. Seeing the breadth of human ingenuity towards torture and killing put a pit in my stomach. None the less, the museum was disturbingly interesting and informative towards humanity’s more barbaric historical past.

To clear our minds we walked to the outdoor market next to El Carmen where there are row after row of vendors selling food. Winding our way past taco stands and tables loaded with cakes and sweet treats we found what we were looking for: a cart selling orange juice. Drinking orange juice from oranges grown in Mexico was one of the pleasures of travel here. The taste is sweet and refreshing, unlike the juice you get in US supermarkets.

Toluca Mexico

 

 

 

 

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A Day at Grutas de Cacahuamilpa

One Day at Grutas de Cacahuamilpa

One of the day trips we took while staying in Metepec was to the caves of Cacahuamilpa, outside Ixtapan de la Sal, a popular place of hot springs and spas. The caves, known as grutas in Spanish, spread beneath the earth over five kilometers in distance. Two rivers traverse the cave system keeping the caves alive and humid.

Grutas de Cacahuamilpa
Souvenir shops outside entrance of the caves

Upon entering the caves visitors are greeted by a soaring vaulted cavern known as a salon. The salon opens into a passage way that continues on, undulating from narrow passage back to salon, for a total of ninety salons. Rock formations, stalactites and stalagmites decorate the interior.

Grutas de Cacahuamilpa
Entrance to the first salon of Cacahuamilpa

Formed by an ancient sea, evidence from sediment found in the river water paints a picture of the cave’s past when a salty sea traversed through the water soluble rocks. Cutting and carving the formations as if out of clay.

Stalagmites Grutas de Cacahuamilpa Mexico
Stalagmite structures

First mapped in 1922, subsequent archaeological expeditions uncovered traces of Pre-Hispanic occupation. Pottery shards found in the caves harken back to the time of the mighty Olmecs who reigned in the region. The Olmecs and later the Chontal tribe performed spiritual rituals in the caves, conjuring the essence and power of the feather serpent god. Upon the arrival of the Conquistadors, the knowledge of the caves was kept secret from marauding and warring Spaniards. The caves were not brought to light to the Spanish until the 1800s, when it was found to be used as a hiding place by Manuel Sainz de la Peña Miranda.

Grutas de Cacahuamilpa
Path to the river

For the modern visitor, the caves are a veritable feast of adventures. Glide through the air on a zip-line to touch down at the entrance of the caves. Then, after a two hour long guided tour learning about the cave formations, you meander down a trail to the river.

Grutas de Cacahuamilpa
Amate tree clinging to canyon side

At the river there are inflatable boats oared by two teenage boys who guide the boat into the caves before turning around for another kilometer. Amate trees with their long griping roots make their home on the sides of the canyon walls cradling the river. At the end of the boat tour the only way back up is a steep bumpy trail by truck or horseback.

Grutas de Cacahuamilpa
Horses of Cacahuamilpa

The only way to end the tour is by eating at one of the many restaurants or puestos (street food sellers). There is everything from tacos to mole to ice cream to fruit. A day in Mexico is never complete without consuming one its many delicious food offerings.

 

 

 

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Tranquility in La Marqueza

La Marqueza Toluca

Tucked away in the pine forest of the Insurgente Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla National Park, La Marqueza is a tranquil retreat from the busyness of Mexico City and the surrounding suburbs. Small valleys and mountain sides of the national park are dotted with a multitude of fun diversions. You can find horseback riding, ATV courses, paint balling, zip lining, and fishing.

Our destination was El Rincón, a restaurant with cabins available for rent and its own private lake stocked with truchas (trout). The restaurant’s menu was extensive, with a whole section devoted to freshly caught trout. Of course that’s what I had to order, trout cooked with onions and lemon in a foil packet. The trout was served whole, fish head and all and I ate every last bit. One of my top five meals of all time.

After lunch we spent the rest of the afternoon roaming the grounds. In the cool mountain air we laid out on the grass and relaxed in the peaceful environment. Far from the hustle and bustle of city life we enjoyed the sun warm on our skin, the scent of crisp pine in the air, and the view of lush greenery.

El Rincon La Marqueza

El Rincon La Marqueza

El Rincon La Marqueza

El Rincon La Marqueza

El Rincon La Marqueza

El Rincon La Marqueza

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The Ancient Teotihuacan Pyramids

 

Teotihuacan Pyramids

There is little known about the origins of the people who established the Teotihuacan pyramids or what they called this ancient city. Located a half hour outside modern day Mexico City, the city came into existence sometime around 200 BCE, with the major pyramids and structures built between 100 and 250 CE. It was not named Teotihuacan, “the place of the gods,” until the Aztec arrived hundreds of years later.

Teotihuacan Mexico
Pyramid of the Moon to the left and Pyramid of the Sun to the right

Teotihuacan flourished between 250 and 500 CE, peaking in 550 CE with a population of 200,000, making Teotihuacan the 6th largest city in the world at the time. Extending eight square kilometers, only five percent is currently excavated.

Teotihuacan Mexico
Ruins of the ancient city

Between 550 and 650 CE the city experienced a downfall. A rapidly declining population, evidence of malnourishment from skeletons uncovered, and the burning of temples suggest the end was not a happy one. With only theories, it is unknown what role internal strife or external invasion played in the part of demise.

Teotihuacan Mexico
Walking the boulevard, Way of the Dead, towards Pyramid of the Moon

After arriving at Teotihuacan we walked down the ancient city’s wide boulevard, named Way of the Dead by the Aztecs. Oriented on a north – south axis, hidden shrines line the way. The boulevard is not all one elevation, instead dipping down into valleys, before stone steps rise back up.

Teotihuacan Mexico
Hidden Shrines along the Way of the Dead

Our destination was the Pyramid of the Sun, the tallest pyramid in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica at 200 feet. The pyramid was used as a temple, but for what purposes is not clear. A cave system found under the pyramid in 1971 belies the sacred nature of the structure, with the cave entrance angled towards the arcing sun.

Teotihuacan Mexico
Pyramid of the Sun

The line for the pyramid reached a quarter mile from the base, with hundreds of people waiting to reach the top of the sacred monument. It took us over an hour to make our way up the tiny stone steps to the top of the steep pyramid.

Teotihuacan Mexico
Steps up the Pyramid of the Sun

To the north, standing before the volcanic mountain Cerro Gordo, is the Pyramid of the Moon. Known as Tenan, “our mother of stone,” construction of the pyramid began in 100 CE. Burials were interred between layers of the pyramid, where excavators found human bodies buried along side falcons, eagles, owls, rattlesnakes, pumas and a wolf.

Teotihuacan Mexico
Atop Pyramid of the Sun looking towards Pyramid of the Moon

The residential areas of the ancient city consisted of apartment compounds, with windowless buildings secluding the interior life from city life. Shrines, platforms for rituals, and dwellings are all found in the neighborhood complexes. There is also evidence the city was home to neighborhoods of Mayans, Zapotecs, and Mixtecs.

Teotihuacan Mexico
Pyramid of the Moon

At the height of Teotihuacan’s power, its influence was felt across Mesoamerica. Architecture and art of the Teotihuacan school was found in other cities, such as Mayan cities to the south. Might and power once radiated from this now mysterious city.

 

Source:

Miller, Mary Ellen. 2012. The Art of Mesoamerica: From Olmec to Aztec. 5th ed. Thomas & Hudson Ltd, London.

Further Reading:

National Geographic – Who Built the Great City of Teotihuacan?

Met Museum of Art – Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Teotihuacan

New World Encyclopedia – Teotihuacan

UNESCO – PreHispanic City of Teotihuacan

Ancient Scripts – Teotihuacan

World Mysteries – Mystic Places: Teotihuacan

Paper Great – Illustrated map of Teotihuacan

 

 

 

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Metepec: The City of Clay

Metepec Mexico

Metepec was our home base for two weeks in Mexico. A suburb west of Mexico City, gated neighborhoods and big box stores dominate the landscape.

This is where we met Bariloche, the humongous and loveable dog of our host – my aunt’s cousin. The best host ever, she took as all over Mexico City and the surrounding region. We never had a dull moment, out from morning to evening getting a taste of Mexico.

Bariloche Metepec Mexico
Bariloche

Aside from touring around, we also ate our way around town – from taco stands to fancy restaurants. The many delicious meals I had really put Mexico on the map for me in terms of culinary favorites. I would say Mexico is on par with France and Italy for the amazing regional dishes offered. However, it is true that I hardly ate any vegetables the whole time. Salads are not big there, nor is serving meals with a side of veges. But I made do with mushroom empanadas and nopales (cactus) tacos.

These are a few places you must try if you find yourself in Metepec:

  • Cócono – a higher end restaurant with impeccable service, amazing desserts and tasty drinks
  • Los Focuitos – the best al pastor tacos, ever!
  • Toks – a classy diner, we ate breakfast here almost every day; I loved their omelet stuffed with squash and spicy tomato sauce

 

Metepec Mexico

One of my favorite parts of Metepec was downtown, the primary location of the  many artisans in the city. Clay is the main medium of choice, with shop after shop selling cooking pots, jarros (similar to a coffee mug), and wall decorations in the shape of the sun. In particular, Metepec is famous for the Arbol de la Vida (tree of life) – a sculpture of a tree depicting images of the biblical creation story.

Metepec Mexico

Metepec Mexico

Metepec Mexico

Metepec Mexico

Metepec Mexico

Metepec Mexico

Metepec Mexico

Metepec Mexico

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